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Lin Keeps It Real


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Tagged as: disney,

Godfrey Gao (x)

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alloutorg:

Meet Aderonke. Before fleeing to the UK, her family was killed and she was arrested and sentenced to death in Nigeria - all because she’s a lesbian.
Now, she might get deported back to danger. Please sign and share urgently - we can stop the UK’s unfair #LGBT deportations:
www.allout.org/aderonke

alloutorg:

Meet Aderonke. Before fleeing to the UK, her family was killed and she was arrested and sentenced to death in Nigeria - all because she’s a lesbian.

Now, she might get deported back to danger. Please sign and share urgently - we can stop the UK’s unfair #LGBT deportations:

www.allout.org/aderonke

(via countlessuntruths)

455 notes
Tagged as: signal boost,

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California
In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.
The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.
Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.”
In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.
Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.
In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today. California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.
Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”
Credit

anarcho-queer:

Women Prisoners Sterilized To Cut Welfare Cost In California

In California, prison doctors have sterilized at least 148 women, mainly Mexicans, from 2006 to 2010. Why? They don’t want to have to provide welfare funding for any children they may have in the future and to eliminate ‘defectives’ from the gene pool.

The sterilization procedures cost California taxpayers $147,460 between 1997 and 2010. The doctors at the prison argue it is money well-spent.

Dr. James Heinrich, an OB-GYN at Valley State Prison for Women, said, “Over a 10-year period, that isn’t a huge amount of money compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children – as they procreated more.

In 1909, California passed the country’s third sterilization law, authorizing reproductive surgeries of patients committed to state institutions for the “feebleminded” and “insane” that were deemed suffering from a “mental disease which may have been inherited and is likely to be transmitted to descendants.” Based on this eugenic logic, 20,000 patients in more than ten institutions were sterilized in California from 1909 to 1979. Worried about charges of “cruel and unusual punishment,” legislators attached significant provisions to sterilization in state prisons. Despite these restrictions, about 600 men received vasectomies at San Quentin in the 1930s when the superintendent flaunted the law.

Moreover, there was a discernible racial bias in the state’s sterilization and eugenics programs. Preliminary research on a subset of 15,000 sterilization orders in institutions (conducted by Stern and Natalie Lira) suggests that Spanish-surnamed patients, predominantly of Mexican origin, were sterilized at rates ranging from 20 to 30 percent from 1922 to 1952, far surpassing their proportion of the general population.

In her recent book, Miroslava Chávez-García shows, through exhaustively researched stories of youth of color who were institutionalized in state reformatories, and sometimes subsequently sterilized, how eugenic racism harmed California’s youngest generation in patterns all too reminiscent of detention and incarceration today.

California was the most zealous sterilizer, carrying out one-third of the approximately 60,000 operations performed in the 32 states that passed eugenic sterilization laws from 1907 to 1937.

Although such procedures may seem harsh, they are not illegal. The Supreme Court ruled in 1927 that women can be forcibly sterilized in jail in Buck vs Bell. Writing for the majority, Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. said, “Three generations of imbeciles are enough.

Credit

(via countlessuntruths)

nothenks:

little-cyes-2:

We have a frog and a pig

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a rabbit and a promiscuously drawn woman

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a donkey and a dragon

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a shape shifting dog and a rainbow unicorn

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these two

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and a warthog with a meerkat who raise a lion cub

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But no one will ever accept the Bee Movie

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I thought this was gonna be about gay couples but gee was I mistaken

(via lgbtlaughs)




annabellioncourt:

plz-no:

Simultaneously the worst and best movie ever made

Actually one of my teachers watched every single version of Romeo and Juliet with the original text in front of him to prove that this was the worst version, but to his great dismay its the most accurate film adaptation of it, with the lines closest to the original text and most similar stage direction and relayed emotions.

He proceeded to show it to us in class.

The thing is, when I was in my first year of an English undergrad, my professor showed us three versions of the opening scene of Romeo and Juliet. The first two were more traditional versions, probably the Coppola film and some filmed stage production, and during the first two scenes, we all stoically watched, observed, and took notes. Then he put this on, and things got a whole less academic. We giggled and snorted and laughed.

So then my professor turned of the TV and said with a knowing smile, “you all laughed at the third one, but not at the first two. Why is that?”

And there wasn’t really an answer except that the third one had just been FUNNY. I don’t think any of us at that age had ever really considered that Shakespeare COULD be funny, that he COULD be laughed at. In school, we learn that Shakespeare is this untouchable literary giant responsible for the most beautiful language and the most affecting drama in the English language canon. But we are so disconnected from the fact that the Bard was also writing for the common folk, and damn if he didn’t like to make them laugh.

I’m an English PhD candidate now, and I do find Shakespeare in his original incarnation funny, now that I’ve had time to understand the proper context and theatrical tradition and have spent time with this mode of theatre. But I think that what Luhrman’s movie does, for better or worse, is he removes the intimidating prestige from Shakespeare and focuses entirely on making an enjoyable movie, illustrating the difficult language with relatable and animated action in such a way that it’s much easier for a mass-modern audience unfamiliar with Shakespearian tradition to engage with.

Whether or not this works for you is a matter of taste. I can’t say it’s a perfect movie, but I do think it has its merits.

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walrus0-and-the-carpenter:

This, every time.

walrus0-and-the-carpenter:

This, every time.

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Tagged as: yup,

basicallyeuan:

you’ll always find a place for punk rock at Hogwarts, Mr Potter

basicallyeuan:

you’ll always find a place for punk rock at Hogwarts, Mr Potter

(Source: funkeh, via neversevered)


capitalette:

guess who read A Book of Tongues last week and has been emotionally compromised ever since

capitalette:

guess who read A Book of Tongues last week and has been emotionally compromised ever since

9 notes
Tagged as: dem elbows,


Once upon a midnight dreary, someone asked a girl what her New Year's resolution was. Wanting to choose the most vague, noncommittal resolution that she could "complete" without exerting any actual effort, she replied, "To keep it real, man." A legend was born that day, my friends.

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